Digiscoping
Help,
Advice & Lessons for All!

Digiscoping Forum

Post Reply
Forum Home > Digiscoping Equipment > Sticky: Swarovski set up ideas

Dannys Digiscoping
Site Owner
Posts: 372

This is a question I was asked some time ago, and I thought it may help to post it on the Forum.




"Good site, can any one offer advice on the following. I wish to buy a top end scope, camera and digiscoping set up  as a present for my wife. Its looking likely I will go for a swarovski 80 HD scope after reading various reviews etc.

Can anyone advise what compact camera would best suit the scope. I have a budget of approx £3,000 which hopefully will get me a scope, camera and the attachment equipment etc. I have a manfretto tripod which should be ok for a scope."

 


--
April 5, 2010 at 3:24 PM Flag Quote & Reply

Dannys Digiscoping
Site Owner
Posts: 372

Hi, I think I can help on most of that!

 

 

Check THIS out.

 

 

This page has all the latest Swarovski scopes and adaptors for compact cameras.

 

 

Don't forget you'll need an eyepiece for your scope. As with most top end scopes, you'll have to buy the eyepiece seperately.

 

 

 

The prices of scopes and adaptors of any make are usually all likewise for price around the web.

 

 

Ebay is always a good place to look for Swarovski gear (thats where I found my TLS800) However it doesnt always go for much less than new!

 

 

Obviously I would recommend Swarovski, as I am getting the best results I've ever had using their scope and adaptor.

 

 

If I was going for a compact adaptor for a Swarovski scope I'd go for the DCB, as it is more versatile with most camera types, and swings out of the way whilst still attached.

 

 

Scope, eyepiece +adaptor should cost you around £2000, which leaves you plenty of money for a compact. I'm not sure what would be good, but I would see what compacts Nikon are offering, failing that Canon or Sony.

 

 

It may be better to get your scope and adaptor and then go to Jessops or a local camera dealer and try a few cameras out on your set up?

 

 

Hope this helps, and thanks for your comments.

 

 

Let me know how you get on!

 

 

Danny.

 


--
April 5, 2010 at 3:24 PM Flag Quote & Reply

Colin
Member
Posts: 1

Dannys Digiscoping at April 5, 2010 at 3:24 PM

Hi, I think I can help on most of that!

 

 

Check THIS out.

 

 

This page has all the latest Swarovski scopes and adaptors for compact cameras.

 

 

Don't forget you'll need an eyepiece for your scope. As with most top end scopes, you'll have to buy the eyepiece seperately.

 

 

 

The prices of scopes and adaptors of any make are usually all likewise for price around the web.

 

 

Ebay is always a good place to look for Swarovski gear (thats where I found my TLS800) However it doesnt always go for much less than new!

 

 

Obviously I would recommend Swarovski, as I am getting the best results I've ever had using their scope and adaptor.

 

 

If I was going for a compact adaptor for a Swarovski scope I'd go for the DCB, as it is more versatile with most camera types, and swings out of the way whilst still attached.

 

 

Scope, eyepiece +adaptor should cost you around £2000, which leaves you plenty of money for a compact. I'm not sure what would be good, but I would see what compacts Nikon are offering, failing that Canon or Sony.

 

 

It may be better to get your scope and adaptor and then go to Jessops or a local camera dealer and try a few cameras out on your set up?

 

 

Hope this helps, and thanks for your comments.

 

 

Let me know how you get on!

 

 

Danny.

 


I use the Swarovski 80 hd with 20 to60 zoom and a nikon coolpix P5100 although this has been supersceded by the P6000.  It is an excellent camera for digiscoping with full manual controls check out my blog for an idea of the quality of the pics that I am getting. 

I have heard that some of the samsung cameras are pretty good too.   But the best way to verify that your equipment matches is

a) Decide on your scope - get the best you can afford - you need good lenses in scope and camera

b) Get the bracket for your scope.

c) Like Danny, I suggest taking them along to a decent camera shop and try the cameras that you fancy on the scope - ensuring that you can get rid of the vignetting by slightly zooming and put it on autofocus to ensure that it will focus through the scope.

d)  I suggest that the camera has full manual control and as big a sensor as possible, this gets better detail. - This cuts down the number of cameras that you need to look at.

 

Once having got your camera practice with all of the settings to find the best one.  I set the scope up in the house (no wind) and focussed on a stationary object at the bottom of the garden and tried all of the settings, making note of which shot was for which setting.  This enabled me to get the best settings for when I was out in the field and got me used to the camera.

Hope this helps.

 

http://colsdigiscope.blogspot.com/

May 28, 2010 at 2:00 PM Flag Quote & Reply

You must login to post.